Education for Social Development

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Education for Social Development

One of the things I loved best as a child was “dress up”. This type of play always involved delight, drama, laughter , self examination, a flurry of ideas about self-identity.
My first delight in Kindergarten was looking around the room and seeing the play house and play kitchen.
I remember so much about kindergarten, i can only wish for all children the most wonderful first experience in school. So it happened that I came upon this editorial in the NY Times and remembered again some of the wonders of that experience.http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/16/opinion/why-poor-children-cant-be-picky-eaters.html?_r=0

 

Here’s my letter to the editor, scroll down on the link, It’s the last one. 🙂

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/22/opinion/disbanding-the-picky-eaters-club.html

To the Editor:

As an educator and a parent, I was reminded of a personal experience in Caitlin Daniel’s exploration of the financial and nutritional costs of children’s food preferences.

In 1960, in a Dewey-inspired kindergarten in Southern California, I was treated to “tasting parties.” Our teacher would arrange small pieces of foods like kumquat on a plate for us to taste. The bittersweetness of the kumquat fed the idea that tasting a new food could be an adventure.

American children from cultures beyond the United States’ borders experience many flavors and nutritional boosts that their more assimilated neighbors lose. School multicultural nights and pot lucks capitalize on building community through sharing dishes from many cultures. In our family, our children asked for plantains after tasting them at school, and another mother taught me how to prepare them.

Writing about food and favorite recipes has been a staple of the whole-language curriculum, and it encourages food studies that broaden cultural awareness. Schools can and should support better nutrition, education and community building.

SARAH GERMAIN LILLY

Brooklyn

 

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